Tag Archives: enamel

Tooth erosion

Acid erosion, also known as dental erosion, is the irreversible loss of tooth structure due to chemical dissolution by acids not of bacterial origin. Dental erosion is the most common chronic disease of children ages 5–17, although it is only relatively recently that it has been recognised as a dental health problem. There is generally widespread ignorance of the damaging effects of acid erosion; this is particularly the case with erosion due to fruit juices, because they tend to be seen as healthy. Erosion is found initially in the enamel and, if unchecked, may proceed to the underlying dentin. Continue reading


Amelogenesis is the

  1. Amelogenesis is formation of enamel on tooth  and
  2. occurs during the crown stage of tooth development
  3. Amelogenesis occurs after dentinogenesis,

Reciprocal induction.

  1. Since dentin must be present for enamel to be formed,
  2. laying down of dentine induces ameloblasts to secrecte enamel
  3. this is termed reciprocal induction.

Amelogenesis occurs in 3 stages.

  1. The first stage is known as the Pre-secretary  phase,
  2. the second stage is known as the secretary phase and
  3. third stage is called the  maturation stage. Continue reading

Tooth development Part 2

Bell stage

The bell stage is known for the histodifferentiation and morphodifferentiation that takes place. The dental organ is bell-shaped during this stage, and the majority of its cells are called stellate reticulum because of their star-shaped appearance.


Tooth development Part 1

Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the mouth. Although many diverse species have teeth, non-human tooth development is largely the same as in humans. For human teeth to have a healthy oral environment, enamel, dentin, cementum, and the periodontium must all develop during appropriate stages of fetal development. Primary (baby) teeth start to form between the sixth and eighth weeks, and permanent teeth begin to form in the twentieth week. If teeth do not start to develop at or near these times, they will not develop at all. Continue reading

Cracked tooth

With their more sophisticated procedures, dentists are helping people keep their teeth longer. Because people are living longer and more stressful lives, they are exposing their teeth to many more years of crack-inducing habits, such as clenching, grinding, and chewing on hard objects. These habits make our teeth more susceptible to cracks. Continue reading

Amelogenesis Imperfecta

Amelogenesis imperfecta is a tooth development disorder in which the teeth are covered with thin, abnormally formed enamel, occasionally in conjunction with other dental, oral and extraoral tissues.. Enamel is composed mostly of mineral, which is formed and regulated by the proteins in it. Amelogenesis imperfecta is due to the malfunction of the proteins in the enamel: ameloblastin, enamelin, tuftelin and amelogenin. Continue reading

Dental care for osteogenesis imperfecta patients Part 2

General Care for People With OI Plus DI

Children with OI and dentinogenesis imperfecta need the same basic care as discussed in Part 1, but they also need to be monitored for cracking, chipping and abrasion of the teeth. Special care will be needed even with the baby teeth. All of the teeth may not be affected by DI, and primary teeth usually are affected to a greater extent than the permanent teeth. Restorative treatment may be needed at some point. Continue reading

Hall technique Part 1

The Hall technique is a novel method of managing carious primary molars by cementing preformed metal crowns, also known as stainless steel crowns, over them without local anaesthesia, caries removal or tooth preparation of any kind. Clinical trials have shown the technique to be effective, and acceptable to the majority of children, their parents and clinicians. The Hall technique is NOT, however, an easy, quick fix solution to the problem of the carious primary molar. For success, the Hall technique requires careful case selection, a high level of clinical skill, and excellent patient management. In addition, it must always be provided with a full and effective caries preventive programme. Continue reading

How to Treat Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity is often caused by the exposure of dentin on root areas due to receded gums or periodontal disease. Normally, the underlying dentin of the tooth (the layer that immediately surrounds the nerve) is covered by enamel in your tooth’s crown, and the gums that surround the tooth. This enamel covering may wear down over time, becoming thinner and providing less protection. Your gums can also recede over time, exposing the underlying root surface dentin. The dentin contains a large numbers of pores or tubes that run from the outside of the tooth to the nerve in the center. When the dentin is exposed, these tubes can be stimulated by changes in temperature or certain foods. Continue reading

How to Notice When Bleaching Teeth is Too Much

Did you know that teeth whitening is the number one requested cosmetic service today and that its popularity continues to soar? A recent survey showed 80% of Americans aged 18 to 49 want whiter teeth, with women leading in this area at 85%.  6 out 10  believe a whiter, brighter smile would boost their self-confidence especially in the 18 to 24 age range. According to the American Academy of cosmetic Dentistry, Americans spent more than $1.4 billion on over-the-counter teeth whitening products last year alone. Continue reading