Continued from Part 1

First aid advice for parent or caregivers

Avulsion 300x275 How to Handle Traumatic Injuries to Your Childs Teeth Part 2

avulsed tooth © kravitzorthodontics.blogspot.com

Always check the child’s clothing for avulsed teeth that are thought to be lost. It is important that parents, caregivers and teachers have assess to appropriate advice on the management of avulsed teeth. Timing is essential and this information can be given over the telephone. Continue reading


Emergency surgery is necessary for people whose intestine has ruptured; intestinal rupture always results in infection of the abdominal cavity. During a diverticulitis surgery, the ruptured section is removed and a colostomy is performed. This means that the surgeon will create an opening between the large intestine and the surface of the skin. The colostomy is closed in about 10 or 12 weeks in a subsequent surgery in which the cut ends of the intestine are rejoined. Continue reading


p16 emergency management medium 300x284 How to Handle Traumatic Injuries to Your Childs Teeth Part 1

© irelandsdentalmag.ie

The management of tooth fracture in children is distressing for both child and parent and often difficult for the dentist. However, trauma is one of the most common presentations of young children to a pediatric dentist. Trauma not only compromises a previously healthy dentition but may also leave a deficit that affects the self-esteem and quality of the life and commits the person to life-long dental maintenance. Continue reading


Diverticulitis is a common digestive disease particularly found in the large intestine. Diverticulitis develops from diverticulosis, which involves the formation of pouches (diverticula) on the outside of the colon. Diverticulitis results if one of these diverticula becomes inflamed. Continue reading


Continued from Part 1

images8 Oral Adverse Effects of Drugs Part 2

pemphigoid © lookfordiagnosis.com

Leukoplakia

Tobacco and alcohol use are important risk factors for leukoplakia and oral cancer.

Drug-related pemphigoid and other bullous disorders

Drug-induced pemphigoid may be due to drugs acting as haptens or drug-induced immunological dysfunction.

Drugs most commonly implicated


What is Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)?

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that is related to the bacterium that cause tetanus and botulism. The C. difficile bacterium has two forms, an active, infectious form that cannot survive in the environment for prolonged periods, and a nonactive, “noninfectious” form, called a spore, that can survive in the environment for prolonged periods. Although spores cannot cause infection directly, when they are ingested they transform into the active, infectious form. Continue reading


VariousPills.0 300x225 Oral Adverse Effects of Drugs Part 1Oral side effects caused by drugs are relatively uncommon but may be important. Some drugs almost invariably cause side effects in the mouth, for example dry mouth from many drugs, and oral ulcerswith some of the cytotoxic agents, while other drugs rarely cause oral complications. Some habits, such as the use of oral snuff (smokeless tobacco), can cause gum recession and leukoplakia (a precancerous white lesion) and possibly predispose to oral cancer whereas oral use of cocaine can cause gum ulceration or peeling of mouth tissues. Drugs that occasionally cause complications in the mouth are discussed below. Continue reading


With these concepts in mind, let us review the histology of the periodontal pocket, especially in the area of tissue destruction and healing after the periodontal therapy instituted. The periodontal pocket is described as one which occurred with destruction of the supporting periodontal tissues. Progressive pocket deepening leads to destruction of the supporting periodontal tissues and loosening and exfoliation of the teeth. The suprabony pockets are those which the bottom of the pocket is coronal to the underlying alveolar bone. The infrabony pockets are those which the bottom of the pocket is apical to the level of the adjacent alveolar bone and the lateral pocket wall lies between the tooth surface and the alveolar bone. Continue reading


5771 16582 1 PB Oral Lesions in HIV Disease

oral candidosis © journaloforalmicrobiology.net

Oral features of HIV / AIDS reflect the T-cell immune defect and are, thus, mainly the consequence of fungal or viral infections. The most common are candidiasis (candidosis) and hairy leukoplakia. Necrotizing gingivitis, accelerated periodontitis, Kaposi sarcoma, lymphomas, salivary gland disease, ulcers of various infective causes and other lesions may be seen.

Oral lesions may indicate HIV infection that is previously undiagnosed, be used in staging and therapy decisions, or cause the individual pain or esthetic problems. Continue reading


The goal of Periodontal therapy is to halt the disease progression and prevent its recurrence, and restore the lost periodontal structure which occured as the result of the disease destruction. The later goal prompts us to evaluate the concept of “new attachment” or “regeneration”, and “reattachment” or “repair”. Each concepts will lead to different mode of periodontal therapy, and ultimately different result. New attachment is the ideal, desired goal, which each periodontist today are trying to achieve in every possible way. Continue reading