Tag Archives: pulp



Dentin-forming cells, odontoblasts, which originate from the ectomesenchyme, form a single layer of cells between the dentin and pulp. The cell body is located on the pulpal wall of dentin and the cellular process extends into the dentinal tubule within the mineralized dentin. The cell bodies are from 3 to 5 m wide and 20 to 40 m long depending on the age of the tooth. The odontoblastic process fills the lumen of the dentin tubule and it is composed of a main trunk, with a diameter of 0.5 to 1 m, and lateral branches. Contrary to the cell body, cell organelles (Golgi apparatus, rough endoblastic reticulum or mitochondria) usually do not appear in the odontoblastic process; however, microtubules, filaments and coated vesicles are present. Odontoblasts are connected to each other with interodontoblastic collagen, the so-called von Korff fibers. Frequent bundles of collagen fibrils enter the odontoblast layer from predentin and are present between odontoblast cell bodies. Ultimately they pass through the odontoblast layer into pulp. Histologically, secretory odontoblasts are columnar in shape. A large number of cytoplasmic organelles are identifiable in young odontoblasts, whereas, aged odontoblasts lose their columnar shape and contain a small number of Golgi apparatus and a small-sized rough endoblasmic reticulum. Continue reading

Cracked tooth

With their more sophisticated procedures, dentists are helping people keep their teeth longer. Because people are living longer and more stressful lives, they are exposing their teeth to many more years of crack-inducing habits, such as clenching, grinding, and chewing on hard objects. These habits make our teeth more susceptible to cracks. Continue reading

Extraction of baby teeth

1. Why extract a baby tooth?

Choosing between extraction and filling or conservation is a very common decision that both dentists and patients have to take every day. With adults the decision making is much easier, if the tooth is restorable and the patient can pay for the treatment then we simply conserve the tooth. If the patient is a child then the process of decision making is much harder as many factors affect the selection of the treatment plan that the dentist have to follow. Continue reading

What is Endodontics?

What is Endodontics?

Endodontics is the diagnosis and treatment of inflamed and damaged pulps. Teeth are made up of protective hard covering (enamel, dentin and cementum) encasing a soft tissue living tissue called pulp.

Pulp c0ntains blood vessels, nerves, fibers and connective tissue. The pulp extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the roots where it connects to the tissues surrounding the root. The pulp is important during a tooth’s growth and developement. However, once a tooth is fully mature it can survive without the pulp, because the tooth continues to be nourished by the tissues surrounding it.

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Dental Infection Caused by Root Canal

Structures of the tooth

Dental infections commonly arise from a tooth problem but can also be related to the surrounding periodontium which are supporting structures of the teeth. Keeping the periodontal structures aside, there are many reasons as to how a tooth can cause dental infections. Dental infections should not be underestimated as it can affect the rest of the head and also the neck region, leading to complications, which if left untreated, is potentially life threatening. There has been many cases demonstrated worldwide where dental infections that were not managed properly has lead to death, hence they should be taken seriously. Dental infections are very easily manageable when they are well localised and it is only until when they are allowed to spread through to other structures that a serious problem can arise. It is of utmost importance at any sign or symptom of dental infection, it is checked out by a competent dentist. And in the case of root canal related dental infections, the offending tooth is identified. Continue reading