Tag Archives: Connective tissue

New attachment and reattachment Part 1

The goal of Periodontal therapy is to halt the disease progression and prevent its recurrence, and restore the lost periodontal structure which occured as the result of the disease destruction. The later goal prompts us to evaluate the concept of “new attachment” or “regeneration”, and “reattachment” or “repair”. Each concepts will lead to different mode of periodontal therapy, and ultimately different result. New attachment is the ideal, desired goal, which each periodontist today are trying to achieve in every possible way. Continue reading

Ehler-Danlos Syndrome Part 2

Signs and symptoms

Signs vary widely based on which type of EDS the patient has. In each case, however, the signs are ultimately due to faulty or reduced amounts of collagen. EDS most typically affects the joints, skin, and blood vessels. Following is a list of major signs and symptoms. Continue reading

Ehler-Danlos syndrome Part 1

Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) (also known as Cutis hyperelastica) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders, caused by a defect in the synthesis of collagen (Type I or III). The collagen, often referred to as “glue”, in connective tissue helps tissues to resist deformation. Collagen plays a very significant role in the skin, joints, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels and visceral organs; abnormal collagen leads to increased elasticity within these structures. Depending on the individual, the severity of the mutation can vary from mild to life-threatening. There is no cure, and treatment is supportive, including close monitoring of the digestive, excretory and particularly the cardiovascular systems. Physical therapy, bracing, and corrective surgery may help with the frequent injuries and pain that tend to develop in certain types of EDS, although extra caution is advised and special practices should be observed to prevent permanant damage. Continue reading

Cracked tooth

With their more sophisticated procedures, dentists are helping people keep their teeth longer. Because people are living longer and more stressful lives, they are exposing their teeth to many more years of crack-inducing habits, such as clenching, grinding, and chewing on hard objects. These habits make our teeth more susceptible to cracks. Continue reading

Types of pontic Part 3


Basically, it is a form of contiguous grafting (pedicle graft} which utilizes as the donor site only the connective tissue of the palate adjacent to the ridge. The epithelium over the pedicle is first removed. This is readily done, using a non-epinephrine bearing anesthetic, by sharp dissection or by use of a rotary diamond instrument. Free bleeding, permitted by the non-epinephrine anesthetic, is evidence of complete epithelial removal. The tissue is then infiltrated with an anesthetic containing a hemostatic agent, and a connective tissue pedicle flap is outlined through to the osseous, and then elevated from the palate within the de-epithelialized zone. In this procedure, it is important that the proximal marginal tissue of the adjacent abutment teeth is not involved. This will ensure stability of the crown margin to tissue relationship. Continue reading

How to deal with chronic myofascial pain

Chronic myofascial pain syndrome.Image is taken from http://www.intelligentdental.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/stress-header.jpg

Chronic myofascial pain syndrome.

There are numbers of condition that can cause pain which seem to be associated with a tooth. These conditions are associated with muscle injury and are non tooth-origin, although the pain may seem to be coming from a tooth or gum. One of the most common conditions is chronic myofascial pain.

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