Category Archives: Dental Crowns

Post and core Part 2

Post design

Posts (or dowels) can generally be divided into two main subgroups, depending on how retention is achieved. Active posts derive their primary retention directly from the root dentine by the use of threads. Passive posts on the other hand gain retention as their name suggests by passively seating in close proximity to the post hole walls, and rely primarily on the luting cement for their retention. Each post type can further be subdivided according to its general shape, that is whether it is tapered or parallel sided. In general, active posts are more retentive than passive posts of a similar configuration, and parallel-sided posts are more retentive than tapered posts. Post choice should therefore be dictated by each clinical situation. Continue reading

Post and core Part 1

A post and core is a dental restoration, which is used to sufficiently restore a tooth morphology followed by future restoration such as a crown, when there is no an adequate part of tooth hard tissue regarding to the required clinical indication of the case, due to loss of tooth structure as a result of decay, fracture or other causes. Post and cores can be referred as one of the foundation restorations. Continue reading

Hall technique Part 5

Important additional notes

1) The crowns used in the research presented here were Ni-Cro Primary Molar Crowns, cemented with AquaCem, both from
3M/ESPE. Any adjustment of the crowns was minimal, and was limited to re-molding the crown margins in some cases with orthodontic band forming pliers. No crown had the margin trimmed. Continue reading

Hall technique Part 4

4. If possible, the tooth should be dried prior to cementation, but otherwise there is no caries removal or tooth preparation of
any kind. No local anaesthetic injection is given. Continue reading

Hall technique Part 3

To begin with…

A full history and clinical examination, including bitewing radiography, should be carried out. Continue reading

Hall technique part 2

The Hall technique manipulates the plaque’s environment by sealing it into the tooth, separating it from the substrates it
would normally receive from the host’s diet. The plaque may continue to receive some nutrition from pulpal perfusion, but there is good evidence that if caries is effectively sealed from the oral environment, it does not progress. Continue reading

Hall technique Part 1

The Hall technique is a novel method of managing carious primary molars by cementing preformed metal crowns, also known as stainless steel crowns, over them without local anaesthesia, caries removal or tooth preparation of any kind. Clinical trials have shown the technique to be effective, and acceptable to the majority of children, their parents and clinicians. The Hall technique is NOT, however, an easy, quick fix solution to the problem of the carious primary molar. For success, the Hall technique requires careful case selection, a high level of clinical skill, and excellent patient management. In addition, it must always be provided with a full and effective caries preventive programme. Continue reading

Crowns for children

Intoduction to crowns for children

Just as we have crowns in adult dentition, so we have crowns for children. These crowns differ from those in adults in many ways, as will be discussed in the following sections. When your child has caries in his or her teeth, restorations with fillings such as composite or even amalgam is sufficient for small cavities, but if the cavity has become so large to an extent that normal restorations will be weak and easily fracture, a crown becomes the better option to protect the tooth from further damage. Continue reading

Cast Restoration – Part 2

Candelilla Wax: Is obtained from plants. It is added to replace partially or completely the carnuba wax. It is smoother than carnuba wax and its melting point is lower than carnuba wax.

Ceregin wax: It is replaced in place of paraffin wax in order to modify the toughness and carving characteristics of the wax.

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Cast Restoration – Part 1

These restoration are made up of metal alloys or porcelain.

Eg: Cast restoration are
Full crowns

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