Tag Archives: abscess

Odontogenic infections in children

WHAT ARE ODONTOGENIC INFECTIONS?

Odontogenic infections are infections that originate from your tooth or the tooth supporting tissues. It can be painful, uncomfortable and disturb your daily activities.  Odontogenic infections can be a life threatening situation when they spread into the deep fascia of the head and neck. Continue reading

Dental care for osteogenesis imperfecta patients Part 2

General Care for People With OI Plus DI

Children with OI and dentinogenesis imperfecta need the same basic care as discussed in Part 1, but they also need to be monitored for cracking, chipping and abrasion of the teeth. Special care will be needed even with the baby teeth. All of the teeth may not be affected by DI, and primary teeth usually are affected to a greater extent than the permanent teeth. Restorative treatment may be needed at some point. Continue reading

How to Treat a Tooth Abscess

Having a tooth abscess is literally a pain therefore one would not have second thoughts in pulling the miserable tooth out. However tooth extraction may not be the only way out of the pain. Continue reading

How to Cure a Gum Abscess

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Having sore gums or a gumboil? Does your tooth hurt upon biting or feels loose? Notice pus oozing out from the gums? You could be suffering from a gum abscess. Continue reading

Dangers of an Abscessed Tooth Part 2

Continued from Part 1

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  • Abscesses in the molar region of either jaw may penetrate the buccal cortical plate above (in the upper jaw) or below (in the lower jaw) the attachments of the buccinators muscle (A muscle that flattens the cheek and retracts the angle of the mouth). In such acute inflammatory edema and pus discharge spread into the soft tissues of the face or neck. This may present as a cellulitis or less frequently as a localized soft tissue abscess depending on the nature of the infection. Such an abscess may track towards the overlying skin to discharge through a sinus on the skin surface. The abscess may then become chronic with the sinus discharging pus periodically, associated with increasing fibrosis, scarring and disfigurement. Continue reading

Dangers of an Abscessed Tooth Part 1

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The majority of infections that appears on the mouth and face region are odontogenic or arising in tissues that give origin to the teeth. Of these, approximately 70% present as inflammation around the roots of teeth, principally acute abscess that involves the tooth and bone. Continue reading

Difference between tooth abscess, cyst, and granuloma

Whenever a lesion is observed on a radiograph, it must first be described in general terms before a differential diagnosis is attempted.  Is the lesion radiolucent, radiopaque, or mixed (combination of radiolucency and radiopacity)?  Where is the lesion located?  The apices of which teeth are involved?  What is the size of the lesion?  Is the margin of the lesion ill-defined, well-defined, or well-defined with a radiopaque border?  Is the appearance of the bone surrounding the lesion: normal, porous, or sclerotic? Continue reading

Abscess tooth, How Does a Dentist Drain it ?

tooth abscessSo what is an abscess tooth

An abscess tooth is actually termed an odontogenic (tooth)  infection. A abscess tooth usually starts as a result of a decayed tooth, the decay which contains bacteria slowly eats away at the tooth and breaks down its structure. Soon enough the bacteria will progress deep enough into the nerves and blood vessels of the tooth termed the pulp of the tooth. Once inside it will start to spread like how a normal infection spreads when a gaping open wound is left untreated. The infection will slowly tract inside the pulp chamber of the tooth and cause the pulp of the tooth to die and become abscessed. This abscess tooth or pus will eventually tract and spread to infect the jaw bone. Clinically an abscess is a thick walled cavity pus. It is well localized or confined in the thick wall of the jaw bone or gum tissue.

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