Monthly Archives: April 2012

Implantable devices as orthodontic anchorage Part 3

Palatal Implants

One of the limitations of using implants for orthodontic anchorage is having adequate bone. Conventional root-form implants require adequate thickness of bone for placement, thus limiting their use to edentulous areas. Several authors have reported the midsagittal area of the hard palate as a suitable site for a short implant. Continue reading

Implantable divices as orthondontic anchorage Part 2

The high level of stability gained from the types of implants placed in retromolar or midpalatal regions is derived largely from the fact that the implants are osseointegrated. Initial concerns about disruption of osseointegration by orthodontic loading were proven to be unfounded by several studies. Continue reading

Implantable devices as orthodontic anchorage Part 1

Over the past 20 years dentistry has seen a dramatic increase in the use of dental implants. What was once an “experimental” or unproven treatment modality is now supported by an extensive research base. The vast majority of dental implant research is centered around the use of endosseous implants for replacement of missing teeth. Recently, the application of implants for use in other specialties has been explored. Previously, the use of dental implants within the specialty of orthodontics was limited to integration of implants into treatment plans strictly to facilitate tooth replacement. The orthodontic treatment that has traditionally been involved in treatment plans including dental implants has been limited to creating space or aligning roots for subsequent placement of implants. The use of dental implants as a direct adjunct to orthodontic treatment has been more limited until recently, but the potential exists for implants to play an important role in enhancing successful treatment outcomes. Continue reading

Skeletal and dental changes brought by Frankel appliance Part 2

Class II molar relationship

Whether or not there is an increase in size or acceleration of growth of the mandible is one of the major controversies in functional appliance therapy. Although many researchers have claimed that the FR causes extra mandibular growth, this study showed that there were no significant differences between the FR and control groups as far as mandibular movement is concerned, the mean FR movement being 4.1 mm, standard deviation 3.0 mm; the control 5.0 mm, and standard deviation 2.6 mm. As the 5.0-mm change in the control was due to normal growth, it can be assumed that the 4.1-mm change in the FR group was no more than normal growth rather than any effect of the appliance. The maximum value seen in the control was 14.2 mm and for the FR it was 12.8 mm; again, because this change in the controls was due to normal growth it must be assumed that even the maximum FR change was no more than normal growth change. That the size of the mandible is unaffected with the FR is supported by evidence from Creekmore and Radney, and Hamilton et al., who found no significant differences between FR and untreated patient groups. Continue reading

Having Too Much or Too Little Saliva Part 2

Continued from Part 1

Having too little saliva


Dry mouth (xerostomia) is a complaint that is the most common salivary problem and is the subjective dryness which may be due to reduced salivary flow (hyposalivation) and/or changed salivary composition. Continue reading

Having Too Much or Too Little Saliva Part 1


Saliva is essential to oral health and individuals who have too much or too little saliva can affect many functions, and may develop infections as a consequence of the reduced defenses. Continue reading

Herpes infection among young children

Types of herpes simplex virus

There are 8 types of herpes simplex virus which affect human beings.  

Type I herpes simplex virus / oral herpes :  causes primary herpetic gingivostomatitis and cold sores around your mouth.

Type 2 herpes simplex virus/ genital herpes : can cause severe oropharyngeal infection and it is usually transmitted through sexual contact.

Type 3 herpes varicella zoster virus: causes chicken pox among children Continue reading

Skeletal and dental changes brought by Frankel appliance Part 1

Functional appliances have been used for many years in the treatment of Class II division 1 malocclusions, the selection of which varies with the type of skeletal and dental anomaly, the growth pattern, and the operator’s preference. Continue reading

Cracked tooth

With their more sophisticated procedures, dentists are helping people keep their teeth longer. Because people are living longer and more stressful lives, they are exposing their teeth to many more years of crack-inducing habits, such as clenching, grinding, and chewing on hard objects. These habits make our teeth more susceptible to cracks. Continue reading

Odontogenic infections in children


Odontogenic infections are infections that originate from your tooth or the tooth supporting tissues. It can be painful, uncomfortable and disturb your daily activities.  Odontogenic infections can be a life threatening situation when they spread into the deep fascia of the head and neck. Continue reading