Tag Archives: gum recession

Oral Adverse Effects of Drugs Part 2

Continued from Part 1

pemphigoid © lookfordiagnosis.com

Leukoplakia

Tobacco and alcohol use are important risk factors for leukoplakia and oral cancer.

Drug-related pemphigoid and other bullous disorders

Drug-induced pemphigoid may be due to drugs acting as haptens or drug-induced immunological dysfunction.

Drugs most commonly implicated

Oral Adverse Effects of Drugs Part 1

Oral side effects caused by drugs are relatively uncommon but may be important. Some drugs almost invariably cause side effects in the mouth, for example dry mouth from many drugs, and oral ulcerswith some of the cytotoxic agents, while other drugs rarely cause oral complications. Some habits, such as the use of oral snuff (smokeless tobacco), can cause gum recession and leukoplakia (a precancerous white lesion) and possibly predispose to oral cancer whereas oral use of cocaine can cause gum ulceration or peeling of mouth tissues. Drugs that occasionally cause complications in the mouth are discussed below. Continue reading

Treatment of a Receding Gum Line

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The previous article discussed about the causes of a receding gum line therefore this article will proceed with the treatment options for gum recession. Continue reading

Causes of a Receding Gum Line

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Receding gums, or known dentally as gingival recession, is a common problem in adults but may occur in the younger age group as well. The loss of gum tissue that leads to exposure of the roots of the teeth may exist with or without an accompanying decrease in the height of the jaw bone. Continue reading

Recession of gums

What is gingival recession?

Gum recession occurs when your root surfaces are exposed as a result of apical migration of your gum position. The pattern of distribution of your gum recession, whether is localized (affect one or two teeth) or generalized (most teeth) is determined by the etiological factor of gum recession.  Studies have shown that gum recession of at least 1mm is present in more than 50 percent of the human population. Continue reading

How to Prevent Gum Recession With a Tongue Piercing

If you have or want to get your tongue pierced, it is important to receive proper care to avoid infection and gum recession. Gum recession, or periodontitis, is a very common problem with tongue piercings due to the jewelry rubbing against the gums. This can eventually lead to exposed roots, which cause much pain and, eventually, loss of teeth.

When considering lip piercing, you should be aware of the risks that you may encounter while wearing lip ring. To avoid the most common risks of a lip ring piercing, book an appointment with a professional piercer to discuss your desire to get one. Ask about the healing process, and how you can avoid damage to your teeth and gums while wearing a lip ring. Continue reading

What to Expect During a Teeth Cleaning Appointment

the cementum is a layer that allows the periodontal ligament attach itself to the root surface

A teeth cleaning appointment is also known as scaling. Every now and then every one of us would need a thorough scaling, because no matter how well we brush and floss and rinse, there will still be some minute debris left in our mouth between our teeth. These debris, after some period of time, will become hardened and these are known as calculus. There are two types of scaling – supragingival scaling, and subgingival scaling. Supragingival scaling is when the dentist only clears away the calculus that are above our gums, and can be seen in plain view. However, subgingival scaling is when the dentists cleans the calculus that are 1 – 2 mm below the gums. Sometimes, scaling is not sufficient for some patients with severe gum conditions, and root planning will be needed. Usually, root planning is needed when there is a gingival pocket more than 4 -5 mm, and there are tenacious calculus and necrotic cementum (refer to the picture to understand what is cementum) stuck to the roots of the teeth. Continue reading

Causes of Sensitive Teeth

Are you suffering from sensitive teeth?

Tooth sensitivity or known as dentin hypersensitivity is short or transient sharp pain of a rapid onset that arises from exposed dentin layer of one or more teeth subsequent to loss of tooth structure (enamel layer of the crown or cementum layer of the root). It usually occurs in response to stimuli—typically cold, air pressure, drying, sugar, acids, chemicals or forces acting onto the tooth—and cannot be ascribed to any other dental defects or pathology. These stimuli are non-noxious, and are not generally expected to generate a pain response, except as seen in sensitive teeth. In contrast, a noxious stimulus would be the toxins of bacteria within a decay lesion leading to dentinal pain. Areas of exposed dentin at the junction between the crown and the root (cervical area) account for much of the observed tooth sensitivity. Continue reading