Tag Archives: attrition

Non Carious/Decayed Lesion

4.Abfraction lesions
5.Localized non-hereditary Enamel Hypoplasia
6.Localized non-hereditary Enamel Hypocalcification
7.Localized non-hereditary Dentin Hypoplasia
8.Localized non-hereditary Dentin Hypocalcification
11.Amelogenesis imperfecta
12.Dentinogenesis imperfecta

Continue reading

Causes of Sensitive Teeth

Are you suffering from sensitive teeth?

Tooth sensitivity or known as dentin hypersensitivity is short or transient sharp pain of a rapid onset that arises from exposed dentin layer of one or more teeth subsequent to loss of tooth structure (enamel layer of the crown or cementum layer of the root). It usually occurs in response to stimuli—typically cold, air pressure, drying, sugar, acids, chemicals or forces acting onto the tooth—and cannot be ascribed to any other dental defects or pathology. These stimuli are non-noxious, and are not generally expected to generate a pain response, except as seen in sensitive teeth. In contrast, a noxious stimulus would be the toxins of bacteria within a decay lesion leading to dentinal pain. Areas of exposed dentin at the junction between the crown and the root (cervical area) account for much of the observed tooth sensitivity. Continue reading

What causes sudden tooth sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity is defined as an experience of pain or discomfort that is sharp, sudden, piercing or excruciating in nature that is felt deep into the nerve endings. The pain may affect the tooth constantly or intermittently depending on its cause and nature.

Generally tooth sensitivity is caused by receding gums and enamel damage that leads to dentinal tubules in the dentine layer to be exposed and hence sensitized. Therefore, thermal sensitization like hot or cold drinks intake may make you cringe in agony. Occasionally, sweet and sour foods or even breezy cold air could also inflict sudden sensitiveness.

Factors that leads to dentine exposure: Continue reading

How Your Daily Habits Can Hurt Your Teeth

Tooth wear © Medscape

Tooth wear © Medscape

Damage to your teeth can be caused by any process that results in loss of integrity of the tooth surface. Tooth decay is a bacteria-caused form of tooth damage. The other forms of tooth damage are the result of mechanical or chemical assault to the tooth structure which may be brought about by your daily habits for example grinding in your sleep and tooth brushing. Continue reading