Tag Archives: partial dentures

Classification of Partial Detures Part 1



A dental prosthesis that restores one or more but not all of the natural teeth and/or associated parts and that is supported in part by natural teeth, dental implant supported crowns, abutments, or other fixed partial dentures and /or the mucosa; usage: a partial denture should be described as a fixed partial denture or removable partial denture based on the patient’s capability to remove or not remove the prosthesis. Continue reading

Failures In Bridge/Fixed Partial Denture



A bridge is a custom-made device anchored to neighboring natural teeth, which replaces one or more missing teeth. When a lost tooth is replaced with bridgework, the teeth on either side of the missing one are prepared as crowns to hold the bridge in place. Bridges, sometimes referred to as a fixed partial denture, look natural and literally bridge the gap where one or more teeth may have been. Fixed bridges appear and function similar to natural teeth.

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How to Decide Between Immediate Dentures and Standard Dentures

Types of dentures © drsimonrosenberg.com

Dentures, or false teeth, are dental prosthetic devices made to replace missing teeth. There are two main categories for dentures –partial dentures and complete dentures, and each category has its own different types of dentures. Partial dentures can be removable or fixed whereas complete dentures can be the standard acrylic type, immediate dentures or overdentures, which include implant dentures. Continue reading

How to Replace Missing Teeth

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The number of teeth in our mouth may tend to decrease with age due to poor oral hygiene, tooth decay, gum diseases and many other causes. When teeth are missing, many problems can arise – the way you bite gets affected, food can easily get trapped in the spaces and teeth can drift. Though there are those lucky few who managed to maintain a complete dentition till their old age, never fret for there are many options to fill in the gap or gaps in your mouth to recreate your perfect smile. Continue reading

Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bridges

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A dental bridge, or also known as a fixed partial denture, is a dental restoration that fills in the gap between teeth by replacing the missing tooth with a prosthetic one made out of metal or porcelain which is then anchored permanently to the adjacent healthy teeth. There are several types of fixed tooth bridges including conventional dental bridges, cantilever bridge and resin-bonded (adhesive) bridge. Continue reading

About Gum Sores From Dentures

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As one gets older in life, you tend to be losing teeth along the way because of tooth decay, gum diseases or trauma. While preservation of teeth for as long as possible may be desirable, it may create greater problems if extractions of teeth have to be postponed till later in life.

Dentures or fake teeth are intended to restore function of your mouth but sometimes they can be responsible for many common lesions found in the mouth including gum sores from dentures. The lesions tend to occur in greater frequency in removable dentures (complete or partial dentures) compared to permanent dentures (bridge or implants) as removable dentures can be distorted or broken with use. Continue reading

Alternatives to endodontic treatment

General information about endodontic treatment

Pulp death and dental abscess.Image taken from http://www.andoverdmd.com/treatment_root_canal.html

Pulp death and dental abscess.Image taken from http://www.andoverdmd.com/treatment_root_canal.html

Endodontic treatment is a common dental procedure that removes damaged living tissue called “dental pulp” from inside the root canals of a tooth. The pulp contains blood vessels and nerves. It is often referred to as root canal treatment or root canal therapy.

Sometimes, the pulp inside the tooth becomes infected by bacteria or damaged by a traumatic injury to the tooth. However, the most common cause of pulp death is a fractured or cracked tooth and deep tooth cavity which can expose the pulp to the bacteria found in saliva. This can result in inflammation, infection and, eventually, necrosis (pulp death).

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