Tag Archives: occlusion

Precision Attachments

In dentistry, precision attachments are the functional mechanical parts of the removable partial denture made of plastic, metal or a combination of both. Precision attachment partial dentures can be used to restore arches where there are not enough teeth for fixed bridgework. They consist of two parts referred as the ‘male’ part that is fixed to a crown inside the patient’s mouth and a ‘female’ part which holds the partial denture. The male is machined by the manufacturer to fit the female with such precision that any male out of the box will fit any female with an exact degree of accuracy. All of the precision attachments in a partial denture are positioned so that they are exactly parallel to each other. The patient can insert and remove the partial dentures and the aim of the precision attachment is to give the patient maximum comfort and ease while wearing, inserting or removing. Continue reading


Spaced dentition is characterized by interdental spaces and lack of contact points between the teeth. Spacing can be localized or generalized due to the number of teeth included. It is a common esthetic problem for many patients. A study in European adults showed that patients with broad midline spacing were perceived as being less socially successful and having lower intelligence. Continue reading


Crossbite is an occlusal irregularity where a tooth (or teeth) has a more buccal or lingual position (that is, the tooth is either closer to the cheek or to the tongue) than its corresponding antagonist tooth in the upper or lower arcade. Continue reading

Le Fort fractures Part 1

Le Fort fractures (also spelled as LeFort fractures) are types of facial fractures involving the maxillary bone and surrounding structures in a usually bilateral and either horizontal, pyramidal or transverse way. LeFort fractures are classic in facial trauma. The Le Fort fracture was named after French surgeon René Le Fort (1869–1951), who described them in the early 20th century. Continue reading

About teeth grinding

Is bruxism considered as a disease?

No, it is not a disease. Teeth grinding or bruxism is a type of parafunctional habit. Parafunctional habit is the habitual exercise of a body part in a way that is other than the most common use of that body part. Continue reading