Monthly Archives: May 2010

Oral Health Guidelines for Pregnant Women


When you are an expecting mother or planning to get pregnant it is important to know some oral health factors that would aid and have impact on the health of mother and the growth of fetus.

When to see a dentist?

It is best to see a dentist before you plan for pregnancy. It is easier to treat your dental decays and gum disease before you get pregnant as body changes may complicate some of the dental diseases. Continue reading

Ever wonder how a dentist is so good at managing children ?

pediatric dentistNon pharmacological management of children s dental  in the dental surgery

Non pharmacological means without the use of any drugs or medicine to manage or control a child’s behavior in the dental surgery so that dental treatment can be done. Most pediatric dentist will use this common method on your children. The method of using drugs or pharmacological methods are usually reserved for those really anxious or extremely uncontrollable children. A useful example would be the use of nitrous oxide in Pediatric dental clinics. Although it was not very popular 10 years ago, it is a commonly practiced now.

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Common Inflammatory Disease of the Jaw Bone

jaw boneInflammatory Disease of the Bone

Inflammation is a protective tissue response to injury or destruction of tissues, which serves to destroy, dilute, or wall off both the injurious agent and the injured tissues. The classical signs of acute inflammation are pain (dolor), heat (calor), redness (rubor), swelling (tumor), and loss of function (functio laesa). Continue reading

Post tooth extraction complications

edemaFacial Edema (swelling)

Many surgical dental extractions results in extraction complications like facial edema or facial swelling after surgery. Routine extractions of a single tooth will probably result in swelling that the patient can see, whereas the tooth extraction of multiple impacted teeth with the reflections of soft tissue and removal of jaw bone may result in moderately large  amounts of facial swelling. The facial swelling usually reaches its maximum size 24 to 48 hours after the surgical extraction procedure. The facial swelling begins to subside on the third or fourth day and is usually gone by the end of the first week. Increased swelling after the third day may indicate jaw infection at the surgical tooth extraction site. Continue reading

Oral Health Pt 3: Importance of saliva

Continued from Pt 2

Saliva and oral health

Saliva is an integral part of oral health and many people do not actually realise the importance of saliva has in our mouth. The role of saliva is often underplayed due to lack of awareness. Saliva has many important functions and it is unfortunate that most people would only realise this when they have a chronic case of xerostomia or dry mouth, which is often hard to manage as treatment available involves mainly palliative care rather than a cure.

Function of saliva

There are three major salivary glands found in the mouth, along with many more minor ones. Each of the major salivary glands produces slightly different quality of secretion, some being more watery and others with a thicker consistency. All these secretions are combined together in the mouth to form salivaSaliva consists of mainly water (95%), enzymes, salivary proteins and ions.  Continue reading

Management of bleeding after a tooth extraction

tooth extractionIntroduction to the management of tooth extraction bleeding

Many patients do not know what to expect after having there tooth extracted at the dentist. Some panic when they see some blood on their mouth whereas some do not even bother if they bleed out profusely. This is a simple instruction guide for patients to follow so that they can manage the bleeding at the surgical tooth extraction site. Continue reading

Management of pain and promotion of healing after a tooth extraction

tooth extractionManagement of post surgical tooth extraction pain

All patients should expect a certain amount of tooth extraction pain after a surgical dental extraction. Therefore, it is important for the dental surgeon to discuss this issue carefully with each patient before discharging them from the office. The surgeon will have to help the patient to have a realistic expectation of what type of pain that may occur and the intensity of the pain as well. Continue reading

Oral Health Pt 2: Effects of toothbrushing, dietary sugars and acids

Flickr Toothbrush (36th/52)

Toothbrushing improves oral health

Continue from Part 1

What affects oral health?

The obvious answer would be oral hygiene care. Importance of tooth brushing cannot be stressed enough and the quality, rather than the quantity matters more. While most people brush two, some even three times a day, the truth is that it does not necessarily prevent you from dental problems such as dental decay or gingivitis especially if you are not brushing appropriately. Having a good tooth brushing technique is crucial to good oral health as being able to remove plaque effectively is directly related to the state of your mouth. In fact, some people with very good tooth brushing technique and reasonable sugar intake are actually able to get away with just brushing once a day without developing any dental problems. The only reason that dentists are advocating their patients to brush twice a day being most people of the population will fail to remove plaque adequately and requires that extra kick to help maintain oral health at good levels. Continue reading