Monthly Archives: April 2010

Oral Health in relation to Dental Decay and Gum Disease

oral healthWhat is Oral Health ?

Oral health encompasses the health of our oral cavity. Our oral cavity (mouth) consist of our teeth and oral mucosa mucosa (gums). The health of our teeth is commonly compromised by bacteria which causes dental decay. Dental Decay is a dynamic process and it occurs due to a combination of a bad diet, insufficient oral hygiene care and bacteria in our mouth.

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How Diabetes Can Affect Your Oral Health Part 3

Continuation of Part 1 and Part 2


Diabetes and periodontal (gum) disease

Examination of the mouth may reveal conditions common in poorly controlled diabetes. Diabetes has long been considered an important factor that influences the risk of periodontal diseases (gingivitis and periodontitis). Compared to non-diabetics, the prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases are increased in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 forms of diabetes. Individuals with diabetes are up to 3 times more likely to have gum attachment loss and bone loss than non-diabetics. For diabetics older than age 40, severity of periodontal disease increases with years of disease duration and the risk of losing all your teeth is 15 times greater in diabetic population then the non-diabetic. Continue reading

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Oral Health Part 2

Continuation of Part 1


A visit to the dentist

Every dental office will treat anyone having diabetes mellitus (DM). On your first visit, you will be asked to fill out a personal medical and dental history for the use of the dentist. Any critical information pertaining to diabetes should be added to the medical and dental history record, which would include information on dosage, time schedules, method of administration, previous adverse experiences with insulin control, number of hospitalizations, and physician recommendations. A good rapport with your dentist is necessary to treat any complications in your mouth.
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How Diabetes Can Affect Your Oral Health Part 1


Diabetes mellitus (DM), one of the most widespread diseases, is a common endocrine disorder that affects an estimated 16 million Americans and these numbers are increasing substantially. Individuals with diabetes face shortened life spans and have the probability of developing acute and chronic health complications. Only heart disease and cancer kill more Americans than diabetes and its complications.

Probably at least 50% of diabetics with mild or early disease pass unrecognised and this proves most unfortunate since early and continued treatment can help prevent some of the disastrous consequences of DM. These consequences can range from blindness, to amputations of limbs, gum disease, kidney failure, high blood pressure, nerves disorders, heart disease and a large reduction in the quality of life. The mouth is also part of the many parts of the organs of the body affected by DM.

Before we continue on to the main topic on how diabetes can affect your oral health, let us lay down some facts about the endocrine disorder. Continue reading

Oral health Pt 1: Why is it so important?

Diagram of the palatine tonsils from U.S. Nati...

Structures of the oral cavity

Oral health is defined as the health of all oral structures and while the usual focus lies on teeth, it is important to not neglect other oral structures such as the lips, tongue, inside lining of the mouth, roof of mouth or palate, soft palate, throat, and tonsils. Periodontal health should also be taken into consideration, as they are the supporting structures of the teeth which is crucial for adequate retention of teeth. All these play an important role in the functioning of the mouth hence need to be maintained at a satisfactory level in order to prevent problems. Continue reading

Infectious Mononucleosis: The Kissing Disease


Viral infections are very common and readily transmitted through saliva and other body fluids. When there is close contact with other persons or their secretions and general hygiene is poor, viral infections mainly affect young children. However in developed countries, adults are non-immune and therefore, these infections are now being seen in adolescents and adults.

Infectious mononucleosis or glandular fever is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of the herpes group (human herpesvirus 4). It is transmitted by contact with saliva, especially by kissing, either from an infected person or a healthy carrier and occurs predominantly in teenagers and young adults. Continue reading